Power Can use Zero Voltage Switch?

This forum is for specialized infomation important to the construction and safe operation of the high voltage electrical supplies and related circuitry needed for fusor operation.
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jeremywu0521
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Power Can use Zero Voltage Switch?

Post by jeremywu0521 » Sat Oct 07, 2017 1:21 pm

Fusor power can use Zero Voltage Switch?
It very cheap and easy to make,
Can use it? If can't ,can use Series circuit make it work?

Andrew Seltzman
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Re: Power Can use Zero Voltage Switch?

Post by Andrew Seltzman » Sat Oct 07, 2017 6:36 pm

Hi Jeremy,

Zero voltage switching (ZVS) supplies can be used for fusors (many comercial supplies are ZVS/ZCS designs), but they would need sufficient output (-40kV at 5-10mA).

Also, these questions belong in the new user chat area:
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Please change your handle to match your name jeremywu0521 => Jeremy Wu and post an introduction in the please introduce yourself forum:
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Andrew Seltzman
www.rtftechnologies.org

ian_krase
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Re: Power Can use Zero Voltage Switch?

Post by ian_krase » Sat Oct 07, 2017 9:25 pm

The inexpensive supplies using ZVS circuit and a single CRT flyback probably don't work.


But it doesn't matter how the high voltage is generated as long as there is enough of it (both current and voltage at the *same time*) which there often isn't.


Also, I'm not sure what you mean by "series circuit" but if you mean putting several moderate high voltage supplies in series to provide the very high voltage needed for a fusor, that's not very practical. Having floating grounds at 20 kV is generally Bad, or at least more trouble than it is worth. Trying to do this with ordinary hardware will often result in arcover and sending high voltage into your house wiring.

Most fusor power supplies are either an X-ray transformer (old, heavy, and rare), or a switching supply that generates 5-10 kV AC, then uses a CW multiplier to boost to the final output voltage. (expensive)

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