Triple grid design at LANL

It may be difficult to separate "theory" from "application," but let''s see if this helps facilitate the discussion.
marsbeyond
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Re: Triple grid design at LANL

Post by marsbeyond » Wed Feb 18, 2004 3:55 am

larry how do i attach a picture like this?

grrr6
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Re: Triple grid design at LANL

Post by grrr6 » Wed Feb 18, 2004 5:25 am

below the enter text part of the reply window, you should see


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Adam Szendrey
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Re: Triple grid design at LANL

Post by Adam Szendrey » Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:43 am

Carl,

I think i was not clear. I know that the cylindrical grid is an old thing, i proposed it more than a year ago (then i came to know that it is in the Hirsch patent, and that others have used it, then i came up with the toroid grid but that wasn't really new either).
What i propose now is a spiral of a cylinder, a tube coil, a coil of a tube. A cylinder wound up like the wire of a single layer coil, creating several turns. It's a bit hard to describe (though very simple). I'm posting a low-end drawing to show it. On the left is the wound up cylinder (cylindrical grid wound up; cut away view its a spiral not rings), and on the right is the shape of the plasma string forming (in theory). This is a standing coil.

Adam
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Richard Hull
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Re: Triple grid design at LANL

Post by Richard Hull » Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:28 pm

I have images in hand of larger cylindrical Hirsch- Meeks grids from the 60s! Gene Meeks was in charge of testing them out and said they worked just fine. They never got a chance to push the envelope with them before ITT pulled the plug. So IEC cylindricals go back to at least 1963. Nothing new under the sun here.

A coil would, of course, make a fine cylindrical grid.

The cylinder might offer more reactant volume in a larger fusor, and 10e12 or even 10e14 isotropic emission might be possible with D-D if the reaction zone volume were beefed up along with the acceleration voltage. My 10e8-10e10 upper limit figure was for small, spherical amateur units where only the voltage was raised.

The sky is the limit in D-D if you have the money, space, input power and a willingness to go through them all with gusto.

Give me a boulder damn mains outlet, an old B-36 "peacemaker" aircraft hanger and a few hundred million and I'll give you D-D fusion flux levels that exceed that of a fission power reactor's core! It would still be only .0000001% efficient though.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Adam Szendrey
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Re: Triple grid design at LANL

Post by Adam Szendrey » Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:58 pm

I was thinking of winding up the cylinder, because it will work like a long straight cylinder, but consumes a LOT less space. Using such a grid system a plasma string (in spiral shape) as long as several meters can be contained in a less then a meter long half meter diameter chamber, and that would mean a lot of plasma in a small space.
Even in a bell jar that is for eg. 30 cm high and 20 cm in diamater could contain at least a meter of such a plasma spiral.
Apart from this there is nothing new in the design.

Adam

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