Can a fusor explode?

It may be difficult to separate "theory" from "application," but let''s see if this helps facilitate the discussion.
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Steven Sesselmann
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Can a fusor explode?

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Sat Nov 12, 2005 7:12 am

With the efficiencies achieved by the fusors in this group, it seems pretty
unlikely that any of them are going to light up the neighborhood, however
and for what it is worth, I put together a little thought experiment (see
attached pdf).
Any comments or references to more accurate analyses would be
appreciated.

Steven Sesselmann
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Fusionburn.pdf
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http://www.gammaspectacular.com - Gamma Spectrometry Systems
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Steven_Sesselmann - Various papers and patents on RG

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Frank Sanns
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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Frank Sanns » Sat Nov 12, 2005 2:42 pm

Yours is precisely the case for why I do not belive a runaway has ever happened for two reasons.

#1. Assume a super gain of 1:10 input:output. You put 1 watt in you get 10 watts out. Run the fusor at some high power like a killowatt. That is 10 KW out. That kind of power gain WILL NOT melt a hole in a fusor in a second or two. It takes quite a bit of energy to melt something that can conduct the heat to another cooler place very quickly like metal can. Unless you were already running the fusor red hot before fusion started, you will not melt it.

#2 If you calculate all the energy from all of the fuel in a fusor, you will find that if it ALL went at once, it would be the power of a quarter stick of dynamite if you have a large fusor. A medium large fire cracker if you have a smaller one. That is if ALL of the fuel goes in a millisecond.

Of course in both scenarios you would be dead from the neutrons and everything around you would be activated for quite some time but I think we have little cause for worry of the fabled Sasquatch runaway.

Frank S.

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by MARK-HARRISS » Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:24 pm

You mean the fabled "modulated octapole fusor" breakthrough?.

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Frank Sanns » Sun Nov 13, 2005 1:33 am

Good one Mark!!! I certainly deserved that one with my fables!

The irony of all this though is that I did have a recent breakthrough (not a runaway) but I now fear nobody on the board will believe me when I do make it public here. Guess that is what happens when you cry wolf. Keep tuned though. Something interesting is coming as some of you have already heard direct.

Frank S.

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Sun Nov 13, 2005 4:58 am

Frank, try me, I might believe you...

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http://www.gammaspectacular.com - Gamma Spectrometry Systems
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Steven_Sesselmann - Various papers and patents on RG

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by MARK-HARRISS » Sun Nov 13, 2005 8:24 am

Well Frank, I think you're one of the many here whose integrity is readily apparent.

I look forward to ANY new results.

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Alex Aitken » Sun Nov 13, 2005 8:55 am

Assuming the temperature would rise in the fusor is flawwed without additional confinement. Ions exceeding the energy of the well would just embed themselves in the wall.

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Frank Sanns » Sun Nov 13, 2005 3:31 pm

Mark and Seteven,

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I can not really share the particular detail until the legal stuff is investigated but I can say that it is NOT over unity but neutrons are produced and this first step paves the way for some novel changes. This approach is not just talk. It has now been tested, evaluated, and proven. I hope to have more details on here in about a month. There is also the outside chance that somebody somewhere has already covered this but I have not uncovered it yet. If it has been done, it certainly has not been exploited to its full extent.

Frank S.

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Frank Sanns » Sun Nov 13, 2005 3:40 pm

Kinetic Energy = 1/2 mv^2 = Joules

Joules = heat

Ions, neutrons, electrons, protons, photons and the like, when they stop are heat. The neutrons and short wavelength photons(like x-rays/gamma rays) will escape and not deposit thier energy in the fusor shell but all of the other plasma species like ions, electrons and longer wave photons (like IR, visible and UV light) and neutrals will be the species that supply the heat to the shell.

Frank S.

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Re: Can a fusor explode?

Post by Alex Aitken » Sun Nov 13, 2005 5:30 pm

I honestly have no idea if you are agreeing with me or not Frank.

My point is that the idea is based on the concept of thermal avalanche. The reaction produces heat, heat makes the reaction go faster which increases the temperature and you are into a vicious spiral. But since the ion temperature is nothing more than the energy given by the potential gradient, it cannot increase. A 'temperature increase' caused by an unusual number of fusions would cause the fragments to escape the well and embed themselves or lose energy to the steel container. So additional fusion does not heat the plasma, its bootstrapped to the grid voltage.

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