Linear IEC Device

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Brehnden Daly
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Linear IEC Device

Post by Brehnden Daly » Tue May 23, 2017 4:29 am

Hey everyone, my name is Brehnden Daly and this is my first (technically second if you count the introduce yourself post) post here on fusor.net! So go easy on me! :)

I created what I call a linear IEC device. It is similar to a fusor in that it accelerate ions toward a negative electrode, except it does this in a linear way rather than a spherical way. My idea with this is that theoretically I could eliminate ion-electrode collision by adding a strong-enough magnetic field running alone the axis of acceleration. I have not added the magnets yet in order to better show the design of the device. I added an image of the device titled "prototypeV2device.PNG" to this post. That image shows the full device. This is my first post so I do not know what it will look like, but I can edit the post later if I find there is a better way to add images. It is important to note that the center negative electrode is a washer. Therefore, ions can travel through to the left side and right side.

The device is powered by a cheap little < 40kV boost converter. I do not know the exact voltage, I just know that it is less than 40kV because I connected a 40kV capacitor to try to smooth the output and it didn't blow. Don't try that at home. I am working on getting a better power source, but it's tough to find a good NST these days. I have tried two modern NST's but they seem to blow their fuses soon after I connect the bridge rectifier. Since I am using a boost converter, obviously the amperage is insanely low and the DC is pulsed.


Here is a link to a video of the device: https://youtu.be/RirTCLZqBUY

My plan is to add some permanent ring magnets around the tube near the center negative electrode. My theory is that this will add a pinch effect preventing the plasma from following the electric field and colliding with the negative electrode.

You can see in the video that the plasma density is more on one side and less on the other side. I believe this is due to tiny inequalities in the length of the left and right polycarbonate tubes. This is also probably due to high pressure. I have a cheap Harbor Freight vacuum pump.

It is also clear in the video and other attached images that the plasma rapidly turns white from its purple-blue color. This is probably due to contaminants in the chamber. I didn't really clean the tube after cutting it/sanding it. I also epoxied the negative electrode to the two polycarbonate tubes. So the plasma could be burning this adding some unknown gas into the chamber. The chamber is originally just filled with air. I am a broke college student, so everything was created on a budget.

I am posting this to get some feedback. Has anyone created a device like this? If you have, how far did you go with it? What did you find? I'd also like to know if there is anyone else in the Orlando area.

And if nobody has created it, I'd still like to see some feedback as I definitely do not know as much as many of you!

And, to conclude, thank you for spending the time to read this!
Attachments
prototypeV2image3.png
prototypeV2image2.png
prototypeV2image1.png
prototypeV2device.PNG

ian_krase
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by ian_krase » Tue May 23, 2017 5:56 am

I can't say anything about how effective this would be, but I like it!

incidentally, capacitors will surely have safety factor so you don't actually know the voltage cap.


Try an oil burner ignition transformer. They are basically like an NST. While they also are getting to be electronic, that hasn't happened as much.

Brehnden Daly
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Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by Brehnden Daly » Tue May 23, 2017 2:34 pm

Oh okay! Thank you very much for the feedback!

I found this one on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Allanson-2721-61 ... ransformer

Would this be a good one to get?

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by Dennis P Brown » Tue May 23, 2017 7:47 pm

Those are rather low current and even for a NST, a rather low voltage (most oil burners are 5-6 kV. Typical NST run 12 - 15 kV at start up)

Still, since any NST, under load, falls to under a few kV your max voltage is not too important. A oil burner x-former is a toy and fairly safe and should be tough (direct short will be tolerated since the voltage will drop to almost nothing.) So for discharge and creating a plasma that unit will do but that is all. After that, not useful except for holding a door open due to its very low current (a few milliamps at best and much less under load.)

My 15 kV NST (20-30 ma max (can't sustain that level, of course)) useful for building voltage multipliers, high voltage but low current supplies. I am glad I bought it since it has a number of useful applications (but not for a real fusor, of course) - it is the old style (very heavy); the new modern ones are complete junk.

Don't buy fly-backs since they are terribly low in current (so useless for a fusor) but can be deadly in overall voltage/power - so, those require very careful handling and that really limits their usefulness in building test plasma's: so, the worst of both worlds.

I see nothing wrong with your current high voltage system. It provides high (but safe) voltage. Any type of NST - unless you need more current - isn't going to achieve anything special for you that your existing supply can't handle for that setup.

The issue is what you want and why you need higher current at much lower voltage?

Also, build a voltage divider and measure your exact voltage: a good device to have and a fun experiment. Of course, fairly inexpensive ones can be had on e-bay but buying a good high voltage, 100 M-ohm or 1000 M-ohm resister(s) and building your own is a good learning project.

ian_krase
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by ian_krase » Tue May 23, 2017 8:09 pm

My OBIT is 25 ma and 10-12 kv max I believe. So only slightly less than an NST. Of course it's no good for real Fusion, but it sputters and glows nicely at low cost and high durability.

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by Dennis P Brown » Tue May 23, 2017 9:25 pm

Better than my NST - after start up, my NST is lucky to hold 3-5ma and the voltage drops a good bit if there is any real load. Your supply is rather good compared to any NST.

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Wed May 24, 2017 3:29 am

Brehnden,

Nice simple device, in principle similar to my FICS experiment here viewtopic.php?f=6&t=10479

You can create a better focus by creating a multi disc stack with a voltage divider so each disc towards the cathode has decreasing voltage.

What I see in your video is pretty typical for this kind of linear device, they tend to flicker or alternate between top and bottom end, but as it warms up you might get a stable beam of oscillating ions.

Steven
http://www.gammaspectacular.com - Gamma Spectrometry Systems
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Steven_Sesselmann - Various papers and patents on RG

David Kunkle
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by David Kunkle » Wed May 24, 2017 3:48 am

I wonder if most of the color change is coming from the polycarbonate. Easy enough to replace with glass. Many different sizes and wall thicknesses available for a few bucks on ebay.

No side views in pics or video. Is the washer ID the same as the polycarbonate tubes' ID?

Any epoxy on the inside? If used only on the outside, it would keep the plasma away from almost all of the epoxy.
If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.

Ernest Rutherford

Brehnden Daly
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Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by Brehnden Daly » Wed May 24, 2017 5:01 am

Steven,

Wow, awesome! Have you thought about adding a theta pinch axial magnetic field? This is what I am going to do with mine. I might have to pass on your voltage dividers just because I don't have the manufacturing abilities to successfully do that. Cutting the tube and epoxying more washers would be my strategy. Do the voltage dividers add an Einzel lensing effect?

That's very interesting that your one device kept running and generating neutrons after you turned off the power! That sounds to me like you've got fusion almost figured out! :D I will reply to this post with an update when I add the axial magnetic field. Perhaps an axial magnetic field is all you need to add to prevent cathode collision losses? Let me know what you think. Thank you for the response and sharing your post! Good stuff!

Brehnden Daly
Last edited by Brehnden Daly on Wed May 24, 2017 6:46 am, edited 2 times in total.

Brehnden Daly
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2017 11:26 pm
Real name: Brehnden Daly
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: Linear IEC Device

Post by Brehnden Daly » Wed May 24, 2017 5:07 am

Hey David,

I agree with you, I do believe it's the polycarbonate. The epoxy could be contaminating the chamber too but I think it's mostly the polycarbonate. This is because I cut the tubes with a pipe cutter and sanded both pieces down with sand paper in order to get them to give-or-take the same length. I didn't clean the inside of the tubes; I could visibly see fine particles of polycarbonate tube. So I do believe it's mostly the polycarbonate. I recently cleaned the tube out and noticed that the plasma did not change color. So I believe the plasma was burning off the fine polycarbonate dust.

The washer ID is the same ID as the tube, yes. The epoxy is slightly exposed inside of the chamber, yes. So the plasma could be burning the epoxy but when I cleaned the tube the plasma did not change color. I also have not seen any changes to the epoxy inside of the chamber.

Brehnden Daly
Last edited by Brehnden Daly on Wed May 24, 2017 5:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

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