New User

For Short Term Learning Discussions ONLY. This area is for CURSORY questions and connecting with other users ONLY. ALL technical contributions need to be made in the appropriate forums and NOT HERE. All posts are temporary and will be deleted within weeks or months. You should have already search the extensive FAQs in each of the forums before posting here as your question may already be answered.
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Jack OKeefe
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Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 2:51 pm
Real name: Jack O'Keefe

New User

Post by Jack OKeefe » Mon Apr 09, 2018 3:12 pm

Hi everyone,

I am new here and I am a high school sophomore. I was wondering if anyone could give me any advice at all on safety regarding fusion, as in how to protect form radiation and high voltage safety. Also, any advice and starting a fusion project would be greatly appreciated. I feel that I have a pretty good understanding of fusion and the science behind it, but no where near someone who has in depth studied it. Again, anything helps.

Thanks,

Jack O'Keefe

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Richard Hull
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Real name: Richard Hull

Re: New User

Post by Richard Hull » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:30 pm

Read the FAQs, read the FAQs, read the FAQs, read, read, read......

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

Nate Price
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Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2018 2:07 pm
Real name: Nate Price

Re: New User

Post by Nate Price » Mon May 07, 2018 8:27 pm

I feel the exact same way. These "beginner" topics are way beyond me. I came here expecting to be taught the things I needed to know to BEGIN a project, not help during it. I guess I will READ THE faqs...

Jackson Oswalt
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Real name: Jackson Oswalt

Re: New User

Post by Jackson Oswalt » Mon May 07, 2018 10:07 pm

If this website becomes a step-by-step tutorial, building a fusor will lose it's prestige.

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Richard Hull
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Re: New User

Post by Richard Hull » Tue May 08, 2018 3:53 am

There are thousands of images of fusors of all types in the images du jour section. by roaming through the images and the FAQs, an adroit person will pick up on the "how to do it" What keeps thousands from ever doing fusion is, almost always, the power supply. What keeps hundreds from proving they have done it is terrible instrumentation or the misuse of adequate instrumentation.

It is a path that is difficult for all but the adroit and dedicated. Having a lot of money or backing helps to smooth out many of the bumps in the road.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Dennis P Brown
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Real name: Dennis P Brown
Location: Glen Arm, MD

Re: New User

Post by Dennis P Brown » Tue May 08, 2018 4:45 pm

A few words to address (partly) some of your questions. Relative to radiation safety, x-rays are the only major concern. The level of danger is not a simple issue - depends on voltage used and chamber wall thickness and issues of viewing ports/geometry. Read the FAQ's and reference some peoples discussions on this subject. This is a very serious concern and must be treated as such. Once you decided on a power supply, people here can aid you on x-ray concerns.

Yes, a operating fusor produces neutrons but for most - short operating times, and only a 100 K neutrons/ sec or less, is not generally a concern (but be aware, in a public setting, then that IS most certainly a concern.)

There is near zero requirement to understand fusion on a level other then what any standard public knowledge for everyone offers.

Assuming you want to side step a demo fusor build (not always a good idea), you have three major concerns that stop 99% of the people who try to achieve provable fusion (but have a fusor chamber and proper vacuum system):

First, and very difficult is obtaining a proper power supply. Read the FAQ's carefully because buying the wrong one is an utter waste of money and time. A real fusor power supply is lethal. Do post questions about a power supply here before buying but don't waste our time with already answered issues easily found in the FAQ's.

Second, obtaining deuterium gas (dry.) Again, a lot of information in the FAQ's and posts here on that subject.

Detecting neutrons. Buying a turnkey system will solve that but it is expensive. Building one's own system is a very complex job but saves a lot of money but requires a lot of knowledge and skill in electronics.

No where did I talk about fusors - their design, components nor wiring - that is because, besides being the easiest part, there is far too much information here to waste my time posting any details. Ditto on the critical requirement of a vacuum system.

Nate Price
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Real name: Nate Price

Re: New User

Post by Nate Price » Tue May 08, 2018 9:20 pm

I know it would somewhat defeat the purpose of building a fusor if you get a specific design, but that's not what I am looking for. I just need a push in the right direction. Perhaps one of you would be willing to do that?

Nate Price
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Real name: Nate Price

Re: New User

Post by Nate Price » Tue May 08, 2018 9:43 pm

And yes, I do know about the FAQs

Tom McCarthy
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Re: New User

Post by Tom McCarthy » Wed May 09, 2018 12:06 pm

Nate, the FAQs do provide a good push in the right direction and outline all that you need.

Watch videos on Youtube, find links to websites, most of all look in the Images Du Jour to see the parts breakdown and what the systems look like.

Get a mentor/guide. You need someone you can meet regularly and be in touch with asking questions about how to put things together, fix things etc. Ideally this would be someone who has built a Fusor in your area, or whoyou can WhatsApp pics/videos/questions to or some similar arrangement.

The FAQs provide all the info: you need a deuterium line, a vacuum line, a high voltage supply, a vacuum chamber and metering for pressure, voltage, current, neutrons. The FAQs provide a breakdown of what constitutes each of these systems.

The thing that will help you most is getting a mentor, it is extremely beneficial having someone experienced with tehse sort of systems that you can bounce questions off for quick feedback. Reach out to local University physics departments, find a grad student or machine shop worker willing to give you a hand. These sort of people are around. You haven't told us where you're from, there might be a board member nearby who you can reach out to.

Use the search function. If you're uncertain about a term, e.g. what sort of vacuum chambers people use, just search 'vacuum chambers' and spend an hour or two combing through the posts making notes. You'll gather much information quickly.

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