Fusor identification

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Adam Szendrey
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Fusor identification

Post by Adam Szendrey » Sat Dec 14, 2002 8:45 pm

Sorry to post this here, but i need to know something.
Have you ever saw the fusor in the picture below?


Adam
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Paul_Schatzkin
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Re: Fusor identification

Post by Paul_Schatzkin » Mon Dec 16, 2002 12:24 am

I believe this is the one known as "Two Prime." It's one of the machines that Gene Meeks was most familiar with, and produced some of the best numbers in the Pontiac St. lab.

Where'd you get the picture, and why do you ask?

--PS
Paul Schatzkin, aka "The Perfesser" – Founder and Host of Fusor.net
Author of The Boy Who Invented Television - http://farnovision.com/book.html
"Fusion is not 20 years in the future; it is 50 years in the past and we missed it."

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Adam Szendrey
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Re: Fusor identification

Post by Adam Szendrey » Mon Dec 16, 2002 7:25 pm

I took this picture with a webcam from a book. I found it in the picture appendix of the book along with some other pictures of fusors, and Farnsworth himself.
And the reason i ask is that under this image i read the the following text:
"Farnsworth's most advanced fusion reactor. This was self-sustaining."
And currently that is "highly unlike".
Here's a somewhat better image.

Adam
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Richard Hull
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Re: Fusor identification

Post by Richard Hull » Tue Dec 17, 2002 10:06 pm

Paul is correct this is actually a modified mark two prime. The warp core image on my website is the same device. They quickly did away with all the spider arms and got serious with better guns. There is no hard evidence to support the claim of self sustaining.

The device was the last major fusor built by the Farnsworth/Bain/Haak arm of the effort. There is much that could be told around the camp fire regarding the effort. Not much of it scientifically relevent or insightful.

Richard
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Paul_Schatzkin
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Re: Fusor identification

Post by Paul_Schatzkin » Wed Dec 18, 2002 2:17 pm

Adam, what "book" are you referring to? Details, please - name, author, publisher. Sounds like one I need to add to my library. Thanks,

--PS
Adam wrote:
> I took this picture with a webcam from a book. I found it in the picture appendix of the book along with some other pictures of fusors, and Farnsworth himself.
> And the reason i ask is that under this image i read the the following text:
> "Farnsworth's most advanced fusion reactor. This was self-sustaining."
> And currently that is "highly unlike".
> Here's a somewhat better image.
>
> Adam
Paul Schatzkin, aka "The Perfesser" – Founder and Host of Fusor.net
Author of The Boy Who Invented Television - http://farnovision.com/book.html
"Fusion is not 20 years in the future; it is 50 years in the past and we missed it."

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Adam Szendrey
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Re: Fusor identification

Post by Adam Szendrey » Wed Dec 18, 2002 11:01 pm

I have bad news for you: It's a hungarian book by György Egely. The title is: "On the edge of the blade".("Borotvaélen" in hungarian.)
And it's about alternative energy sources, has a whole chapter about Tesla's life, about Heaviside Bell, Edison (in sub-chapters) and a sub-chapter about Farnsworth's life and his work (the television, and the fusor). He writes down how these scientist lived, and worked, and how the economy behaved and many other connections. Also there is a chapter about the ancient chinese , and there is a chapter titeled "Black gold" about the closing oli crisis, and similar things. Actually it describes how the biggest empires of history collapsed because they did not care about technological advance and because the momentum of discoveries broke. "History is spookily repeating it's self..." This is written on the bottom of the back of the book cover. It's actually very interesting.
Egely also wrote a book titeled:" Forbidden inventions".
The science community really hates him for this.
Few papers post his articles, and most say that he is a fraud. I don't know if he's work is translated into english, but i don't think it is.

Adam

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Re: Fusor identification

Post by marsbeyond » Wed Apr 09, 2003 12:11 am

Adam,

You could do us all a favor and translate the fusor chapter and put it and the pictures on a free web hosting site.

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